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North Manitou, MI  Lighthouse destroyed.   

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North Manitou Lighthouse

1892 – North Manitou Island, at the north end of Manitou Inland, lake Michigan, Michigan.—The immense commerce between the Straits of Mackinac and Green Bay uses three different passages:
(1) The north passage, which is protected by the lights at White Shoal, Squaw Island, and Seul Choix Pointe.
(2) The passage between North Fox Island and Beaver Island.
(3) The passage between North Manitou and South Fox islands.
The choice between these channels depends entirely upon the conditions of the weather prevailing at the time. In view of the immense trade, each passage needs to be well lighted. A light on the north end of North Manitou Island is needed for the protection of the third passage above named. There is a large traffic through the passage north of North Manitou Island, which is unmarked, except by the Fox Island light, 17 miles distant. A light and fog signal on the north end of North Manitou will be a valuable aid to navigation. It is estimated that they can be established at a cost not to exceed $20,000, and it is recommended that an appropriation of this amount be made for that purpose.

1893 – North Manitou Island, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—The establishment of a light and fog signal here, at a cost not to exceed $20,000, was authorized by the act approved February 15, 1893, but no appropriation therefor has yet been made. The Board recommends that the amount named be appropriated.

1894 – North Manitou Island, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—The following statement, made in the Board’s last report, is repeated:
The establishment of a light and fog signal here, at a cost not to exceed $20,000, was authorized by the act approved February 15, 1893, but no appropriation therefor has yet been made.
The Board recommends that the amount named be appropriated.

1895 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—An appropriation of $20,000 was made by the act approved March 2, 1895, for establishing a light and fog-signal station on this island. Negotiations for the purchase of a site are now in progress.

1896 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—Steps were taken to obtain title to a site by condemnation in September, 1895, and the matter has since then been in the hands of the United States attorney. Plans and specifications for duplicate fog-signal boilers and machinery were made. Bids were opened April 15 and a contract was made. Plans, specifications and advertisement for a keepers’ double dwelling and a brick fog-signal house were made, and plans and specifications were made for the minor structures. It is expected that these buildings can be completed under contract this season. Plans for the metal tower are being prepared.

1897 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—Contracts for the construction of a keeper’s double dwelling and a fog-signal house were made. Operations were begun in August, and in October, 1896, the fog-signal building was completed, with the exception of the plastering and ceiling overhead. The fog-signal boilers and machinery were completed under contract and inspected and delivered at the station in October, 1896, by the light-house tender Amaranth. Both boilers and stacks were set up, a tank stand built and the tank placed thereon, the north engine was set and piped to the boiler tank, well, and hand pump, and a well was sunk. The north signal was finished, ready for service. The signal was put in operation on November 20, 1896. During November the dwelling was completed. The fences and sidewalks were built and the oil house was finished. The work under contract was all completed in December, 1896. Various repairs were made. Plans for a cylindrical steel tower are in course of preparation.

1897 – North Manitou, Michigan.—This 10-inch steam whistle, in duplicate, established November 20, 1896, was in operation some 234 hours, and consumed about 6 tons of coal and 19 cords of wood.

1898 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—The material for a wooden tower was ordered and delivered at the Detroit light house depot for erection at an early date. Contract was made for furnishing a fourth-order lantern. A fog whistle was repaired.

1898 – North Manitou, Michigan.—The 10-inch steam whistles, in duplicate, were in operation some 584 hours and consumed about a ton of coal and 63 cords of wood.

1899 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—A fourth-order lantern was provided under contract. The following named work was done toward erecting a wooden light tower in July: The knoll at the site for the tower was leveled, and four brick piers were built with footings, and the posts, sills, caps, and braces were framed. The erection of the wooden tower was completed in August and the lantern put up. The light, an alternating red and white flash every ten seconds, was established on September 15, 1898. The old landing crib was rebuilt and enlarged. Another crib was built with an ice breaker on the outside, and the boat ways were extended some 55 feet. A one-plank walk, 644 feet long, was laid from the boathouse to the dwelling and a lightning rod was put up. A flag pole 60 feet long was provided. The skeleton frame tower was covered with clapboarding, and various repairs were made.
A judgment was rendered January 23,1899, in the United States district court for the condemnation of a site on North Manitou Island for the light and fog-signal station, and $487.41 was deposited with the clerk of the court on February 25, 1899, in payment therefor. Due record of the fact was made in the office of the register of deeds of Leland County, Mich., and a description and plat of the land sent to the governor.

1899 – North Manitou, Michigan.—The 10-inch steam whistles, in duplicate, were in operation some 747 hours and consumed 88 cords of wood.

1900 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—Three State-tax land deeds of the State of Michigan, completing the title to the site for North Manitou light-station, Michigan, were recorded. The boathouse was moved across the point, a crib for a boat landing was built, boat ways were put in, and a walk laid from the crib to the boathouse. A frame barn and wood shed were built. Various repairs were made.

1900 – North Manitou, Michigan.—This 10-inch steam whistle, in duplicate, was in operation some 647 hours and consumed about 2 tons of coal and 58 cords of wood.

1901 – North Manitou, Michigan.—The 10-inch steam whistles in duplicate were in operation some 374 hours and consumed about 35 cords of wood.

1902 – North Manitou, Michigan.—The 10-inch steam whistles in duplicate were in operation some 554 hours and consumed about 64 cords of wood.

1903 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—The grounds for a space of 151 feet wide by 450 feet long were fenced in, graded, and a top dressing of soil placed. Various repairs were made.

1903 – North Manitou, Michigan.—The 10-inch steam whistles in duplicate were in operation some 564 hours, and consumed about 58 cords of wood.

1904 – North Manitou, Michigan.—This 10-inch steam whistle, in duplicate, was in operation some 651 hours and consumed about 70 cords of wood.

1905 – North Manitou, Lake Michigan, Michigan.—Some 464 running feet of concrete walk 3 feet wide, and about 177 running feet of concrete walk 2 feet wide were laid. A landing was placed adjoining the boathouse. A duplex steam pump was installed in the fog-signal plant.

1905 – North Manitou, Michigan.—This 10-inch steam whistle, in duplicate, was in operation some 586 hours, and consumed about 70 cords of wood.

1906 – North Manitou, Michigan.—This 10-inch steam whistle, in duplicate, was in operation some 242 hours, and consumed about 30 cords of wood.

1907 – North Manitou, Michigan.—This 10-inch steam whistle was in operation some 264 hours and consumed about 35 cords of wood.

1913 – William Gordon, first assistant keeper of North Manitou Light Station, Wis., with the lighthouse launch, towed a disabled power boat to safety, repaired the machinery, and furnished the six men on board with food.

1914 – William Gordon, first assistant, towed power boat to safety; repaired machinery and supplied crew of 6 men with food.

1914 – Reynold W. Johnson, keeper, Nels Nelson, first assistant, and Martin Larsen, second assistant, rendered assistance in saving gasoline launch which had been driven ashore and furnished clothing, board, and lodging for 4 days to the 2 men on board. Occurred on February 23, 1914.

1916 – North Manitou Light Station. On April 24, 1916, the characteristic of North Manitou Light Station was restored and intensity of light increased June 9, 1916, to red 7,200 and white 24,000 candlepower.

1916 – R.W. Johnson, keeper, M. Telgard, first assistant, assisted in hauling disabled motor boat, put on beach, and relaunching after rudder had been repaired. Motor boat Alice L.

1916 – R.W. Johnson, keeper, M. Telgard, first assistant, Assisted in rescuing motor fish boat Why-not.

1917 – R.W. Johnson, keeper, and M. Telgard, first assistant, towed disabled boat with 3 men aboard to shore and furnished them gasoline. Motor boat Teal; Peter Stormer, owner.

1918 – R.W. Johnson, keeper, hauled launch Teal ashore north of fog-signal building, out of danger.

1932 – The fog signal at this station was discontinued October 15. Light automated in 1932. Keepers reassigned.

1935 – NorthManitou Shoal. Mich.-This light station replaces the NorthManitou Lightship No. 103 and NorthManitou Island Light Station, and serves as an improved mark for the outer end of the shoal projecting southerly from the south end of NorthManitou Islands. A substantial saving in annual maintenance cost will be effected. The crib on which the structure is built stands in 22 feet of water, on a hard sand and coarse stone bottom.

Keepers:

  • Head: Andrew G. Bourissau (1897 – 1898), Fredrick A. Samuelson (1898 – 1909), Edward H. Cornell (1909 – 1911), Reynold W. Johnson (1911 – 1918), Ernest G. Hutzler (1919 – 1928), Paul A. Walters ( – 1932).
  • First Assistant: Edward Mallette (1897 – 1898), John C. McKinnon (1898 – 1903), William Buckler (1903 – 1907), Reynold W. Johnson (1907 – 1911), William Gordon (1911 – 1913), Nels A. Nelson (1913 – 1916), Martin Telgard (1916 – 1918), Joseph J. Marsh (at least 1919 – at least 1921), Guy Patterson (1922), John J. Hahn (1923 – 1925), Michael M. Rotta (1925 – 1928), Nels Nelson (1928 – 1931), Carl Walters ( – 1932).
  • Second Assistant: Walter E. Groben (1898 – 1899), Sheridan J. King (1899 – 1902), William Buckler (1902 – 1903), John L. Paetschow (1903 – 1904), Reynold W. Johnson (1904), Edward M. Wheaton (1904), George W. Steffins (1904), Adolph E. Peltier (1904 – 1905), Reynold W. Johnson (1905 – 1907), Frank Taylor (1907), Nels A. Nelson (1907 – 1909), Alfred L. Cornell (1909), Jerome M. Robinson (1909 – 1910), Ross F. Wright (1910 – 1911), Erving Stibitz (1911 – at least 1912), Martin Larsen (at least 1913 – at least 1914), Martin Telgard (at least 1915), Albert H. Davenport (at least 1917), John L. Paetschow (1918 – ), Carl K. Nafus (at least 1919), Charles Linsmeier (1920 – 1922), John J. Hahn (1922 – 1923), Michael M. Rotta (1923 – 1925), Ray Robinette (1925), Nels Nelson (1927 – 1928), Albin F. Swenson (at least 1930 – 1932).

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