Home Maps Resources Calendar About
Resources Calendar About
Governors Island, NY  Lighthouse destroyed.   

Select a photograph to view a photo gallery

Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery

See our full List of Lighthouses in New York

Governors Island Lighthouse

1873 – Fort Columbus, New York Harbor.—The fog-bell was erected on the sea-wall on the northwest extremity of Governor's Island, and put in operation during the month of February, 1873.

1879 – Governors Island (Buttermilk Channel), New York.—There has been established, during the year, upon application of the commanding officer of the Military Department of the East, a fog-bell, to be struck by hand, on the extremity of the government wharf, on the easterly side of Governor's Island, in New York Bay.

1880 – Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, New York Harbor, New York.— New sash and blinds were fitted to the fog-bell house, the buildings were repainted and repaired, arid the fog-bell machinery was put in order.

1886 – Fort Columbus Fog-Signal Station, on the northwest end of Governor's Island, New York Harbor, New York.—The keeper of the fog-signal states that an earthquake shock was felt at that station on August 31 at 9.55 p. m.; that it lasted four minutes; that no unusual noise was heard; but one shock was felt, and that very light. He also states that at the time he felt the shock he was in the house upstairs in bed lying down and was awakened by the shaking of his bed. The shock felt like a tremor. It seemed to come horizontally. The condition of the ground here is sandy. The atmosphere in the evening was of a purple hue and very heavy.

1888 – Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, New York Harbor, New York.— A small mast, 25 feet long, fitted with crane, blocks, falls, and cleat, was set up on a platform properly braced and weighted with stone, located at the north end of the fog-signal or bell house, and the lantern was suspended from the bracket or crane. In February, 1888, the light was changed and is now located on the parapet wall of Castle William directly above and in rear of the fog-bell house. Two lights are shown, one above the other, 10 feet apart.

1894 – Governors Island post light, northwest end of Governors Island, New York.—A Gamewell fog-bell apparatus was substituted for the worn-out Stevens apparatus.

1896 - Governors Island post light, New York.—The fog signal was repaired and new roof was put on. The building stands under the wall of Castle William, which is used as a saluting battery, and is extensively damaged and partly blown into the water whenever a salute is fired.

1901 – Governors Inland post light, New York.—An improved fog signal was installed November 12, 1900, consisting of a blower siren operated by a 2 ½-horsepower oil engine, to sound a continuous blast. Various repairs were made.

1901 - Governors Island, New York.—This blower siren, established November 12, 1900, worked by a 2 ½-horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 47 hours and consumed some 6 gallons of oil. In case the siren should be disabled, the bell will sound a double blow every 20 seconds.

1902 – Governors Island, New York.—This blower siren, worked by a 2 ½-horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 186 hours and consumed some 83 gallons of oil. In case the siren should be disabled the bell is to be struck a double blow every 20 seconds.

1903 – Governors Island, New York.—This blower siren, worked by a 2 ½ -horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 273 hours and consumed some 166 gallons of oil.

1904 – Governors Island, New York.—This compressed-air siren, worked by a 2-horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 295 hours and consumed some 143 gallons of oil.

1905 – Governors Island, New York.—This compressed-air siren, worked by a 2-horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 205 hours, and consumed some 248 gallons of oil.

1906 – Governors Island, New York.—Plans and specifications were prepared and bids called for to build a stone fog-signal house.

1906 – Governors Island, New York.—This comprest-air siren, worked by a 2-horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 213 hours, and consumed some 210 gallons of oil.

1907 – Governors Island, New York.—A brown-stone fog-signal building was on January 23, 1907, added to the station.

1907 – Governors Island, New York.—This compressed-air siren, worked by a 2-horsepower oil engine, was in operation about 111 hours, and consumed some 149 gallons of oil.

1910 – Works considered essential as resources permit: No. 29. Governors Island light-station, N. Y.—For establishing a light and fog-signal station on Governors Island, N. Y., and authority is granted to locate said station on filled land, $60,000.
With the nearly completed addition to Governors Island, New York Harbor, which forms a long point to the southwest between two important channels, it is very essential that a light and fog signal be established at or near this point. Authority is requested to locate it on filled land, which will materially reduce the cost.

1911 – Governors Island light station, N. Y.— For establishing a light and fog-signal station on Governors Island, N. Y., and authorizing the location of said station on the filled land of the military reservation, $60,000.
Note.—With the approaching completion of the addition to Governors Island, New York Harbor, which forms a long point to the southwest between 2 important channels, it is essential that the necessary permanent aids to navigation be established at or near this point. Authority is requested to locate it on filled land, which will greatly reduce the cost.

1923 – O.M. Bunting, assistant keeper, and wife, rendered assistance to men in boat who were lowing for help, landing them beside sea wall, and by rope and ladder took them off and gave them a welcome hand.

Keepers:

  • Head: Leslie Moore (1873 – 1882), John T. Barratt (1882 – 1886), Henry B. Dardingkiller (1886 – 1892), Henry Chapman (1893 – 1894), William Elliott (1894 – 1895), Thomas Bulfin (1896 – 1904), Martin Way (1904 – 1906), Edmond Delattre (1906 – at least 1912), Hugh W. McGovern (at least 1913 – at least 1919), Lars E. Larson (at least 1921 – at least 1925), Orlando M. Bunting (at least 1927 – at least 1930), Steven Bayus (1934 – 1943), Lawrence N. Byrne (1943 – 1947), Thomas E. Rasmussen (1947 – at least 1948).
  • Assistant: Charles Bruhn (1904 – 1905), Peter Lewis (1905), Harry E. Potter (1905 – 1906), Dennis F. Gallagher (1906), Lorenzo D. Bell (1906 – 1907), Matthew Netter (1907 – 1909), J. Barnes (1909), G. Kopple (1909 – 1910), Spurgeon B. Allen (1910), Harry L. Nuller (1910), Frank P. Smith (at least 1915), Lars E. Larson (at least 1917 – at least 1919), Orlando Bunting (at least 1921 – at least 1925), Stephen Bayus (1926 – 1934), Edward T. Pastorini (1937 – 1942).

Copyright © 2001- Lighthousefriends.com
Pictures on this page copyright National Archives, Coast Guard, and JACLAY, used by permission.
email Kraig